YOUR ENGINE, YOUR ATTITUDE, YOUR PERSONALITY

Cars45 DIY Tips #Update

 

In trying to live a more frugal life, it is paramount that one needs to get better at handling projects that we once paid professionals to do. In addition to home improvement projects, we should understand that plenty can be saved by taking on some auto repairs and maintenance jobs by oneself.

An oil change can cost 7k, and having your spark plugs changed professionally will run you about 5k. The list goes on and on. You can easily slash these auto expenses by taking the repairs on yourself – saving perhaps thousands of Naira over the life of your vehicle.

Today, we will be sharing some DIY Tips that cars owners find extremely strenuous, not because they find it appalling but because they see it as a no go area for themselves but for mechanical personnels only.

 

 

  1. RADIATOR FLUSH
  • Tools Needed: Screwdriver or wrench, rags, radiator flush solution, coolant, funnel, used coolant receptacle
  • Time to Complete: 30 minutes

Your car’s radiator and cooling system need to be clean to work efficiently and effectively. With normal wear and tear, your car’s radiator builds up deposits that can disrupt the cooling system. A radiator flush is a quick and inexpensive way to keep your system in shape. Consult your owner’s manual to find out if you need to flush the radiator yearly or every two years.

  1. Make sure your car is completely cool before you begin.
  2. Check your owner’s manual to find the radiator’s drain plug. Put your used coolant receptacle in place, unscrew the drain plug, and let the old coolant drain completely.
  3. Replace the drain plug and remove the radiator cap.
  4. Use the funnel to add the radiator flush cleaning solution and then fill the rest of the radiator with water.
  5. Replace the radiator cap.
  6. Start the car, and let it run until it gets to its normal operating temperature.
  7. Turn on your heater to its hottest position, and let the car run for 10 minutes.
  8. Turn the car off and wait for the engine to cool completely.
  9. Drain the contents of the radiator.
  10. Refill the radiator with fresh coolant.
  11. Be sure to dispose of the old coolant safely, by bringing it to an auto parts store, gas station, or mechanic. Old coolant is fatal, but its sweet taste can be enticing to pets.

Working with coolant is a step toward more advanced DIY auto projects. Temperature can be a dangerous issue when you’re working on your car, so make sure you give your engine plenty of time to cool before you start and before you drain the radiator. Don’t rush this job, and always err on the side of caution.

 

  1. OIL/OIL FILTER

 

  • Tools Needed: Ratchet, oil filter wrench, oil pan, funnel
  • Time to Complete: 30 to 45 minutes

Experts say you should change your oil every 3,000 miles, but with better products and cars operating more efficiently, I think you can get away with changing it every 5,000 miles. Whichever benchmark you decide to use, you can save time and money by handling the change yourself. Before you start, keep in mind these precautions:

Never change your oil when your engine is hot. Park, wait for it to cool, and then get started. Driving around the block to heat the car and loosen the oil can result in a more effective drain, which is good news, but you must let the engine cool before going to work.
You’ll have to jack up your car, so make sure you’re comfortable safely handling a jack.
Now that you’ve covered safety first, it’s time to get a little dirty.

  1. Get under your car and locate the vehicle’s oil pan. It shouldn’t be hard to find.
  2. Unscrew the drain plug and drain all of the old oil into your oil pan.
  3. Once all of the oil is drained, replace the drain plug.
  4. Go back to your engine and remove the old oil filter with your oil filter wrench. (Be careful, because the oil filter contains some old oil as well).
  5. Lubricate the rubber gasket on the new oil filter with some new motor oil.
  6. Fill the new oil filter about two-thirds of the way with new oil.
  7. Screw in the new oil filter. Hand-tighten it only.
  8. Fill the engine with new oil, using your funnel.
  9. With a dip-stick, double check your oil level to be sure you’ve added enough.
  10. Discard the old oil filter and recycle the old oil (most gas stations will take it).

Changing your oil is the dirtiest job on the list, but it might be the most rewarding too. Though you can find plenty of quick-service stations nearby, when you think about going possibly four times a year, the expense and time commitment adds up.

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