FIX IT, ITS YOURS

#Cars45 DIY Tips

 

So it has come to our notice that quite a number of car users have made owning a car look so tedious, this is own to the fact that car users *the lazy ones* npt only abuse the integrity of their car but also give it a horrifying look. I could remember the day I saw a 2012 Range Rover sport on the Third mainland bridge; the sight of the car was so dirty that the only clear and neat spot was the windshield (thanks to the wiper).

Virtually few car users know and stand with the assertion that “The way you treat your car is based on your personality,” some are even satisfied with the cringe a dirty car brings – every car owner; young or old have a responsibility and that is the four wheel. You don’t need to be a mechanic before you can drive a car, you just have to be mechanically oriented, finding the repairs that you know everyone can handle quickly and easily.  

 

 

WINDSHIELD WIPERS

  • Tools Needed: None
  • Time to Complete: 15 minutes


I find it astonishing whenever I see some car owners telling the wiper blade sellers to help them install it. Some have even made it a habit to change wiper blades. Of a truth, you’ll need new wiper blades after about six months or a year of use. You probably tend to go a little longer before asking your mechanic to change them, but you shouldn’t deal with the danger of streaking while you put off an inconvenient trip to the auto shop.

Wiper blade setup differs quite a bit from car to car, so you may have to follow a few different steps according to your owner’s manual. Basically, the process is similar to changing your air filter:

  1. Lift the blades, as if you were washing your windshield by hand, and remove the old blades.
  2. Pay attention to how the old blades connect to the metal arms.
  3. On most models, you’ll see a tab on the underside of the wiper. Push the tab to remove the old blade.
  4. Attach the new blades, being careful not to bend the wiper arms or scratch your windshield. Line everything up and make sure the new ones are secure and tight.

If you get distracted or just can’t remember exactly how the new blades should fit on the wiper arm, don’t worry. The packaging for the new blades should have a general set of instructions and a helpful diagram engraved on it.

 

BRAKE PADS

  • Tools Needed: Lug wrench, C-clamp, open-end or adjustable wrench, hammer
  • Time to Complete: 30 minutes to an hour

You’ll need to replace most brake pads around every 20,000 miles, but as always, check your owner’s manual for specifics about your model. If you consistently do a lot of “stop-and-go” driving, you’ll need to replace them more frequently. Brake pads are DIY-eligible, but safety is your top priority. Be careful, get everything ready before you start, and if you’re uncomfortable at all, pay a professional to do it for you.

  1. Jack up your car and rest it securely on jack stands.
  2. Break the lugs on your tires before you do anything else.
  3. Remove the wheel.
  4. Remove the brake caliper so that the brake pads slide out through the top. The brake caliper should be at the 12 o’clock position, just above the lug bolts. On the back of the caliper you’ll find a bolt on both sides. Remove the bolts and set them aside. Hold the caliper from the top and pull upwards. Give it a few taps if you need to, making sure not to disturb the brake line (a black hose). Don’t let the caliper hang from the brake line; find somewhere to set it securely. With the caliper out of the way, the old brake pads should slide right out.
  5. Replace old pads with the new pads, securing them with the same retaining clips that held the old pads in place. If you have an older car, you might need to utilize your hammer here a little bit. Proceed gently!
  6. Compress the brake piston. Get out your C-clamp and put the end with the screw on it against the piston with the other end on the back of the caliper assembly.
  7. Tighten the clamp until the piston has moved far enough to where you can place the caliper assembly over the new pads.
  8. Re-install the brake caliper (the opposite process of what you did when you removed it), and then simply put your wheel back on.

With this project, you’re stepping up to becoming a DIY expert. If you’re still mastering how to change your oil, you might want to build your confidence level a little before taking on this project.

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